Death of Mory Kanté, made famous with his hit “Yéké Yéké”

The singer and musician guinean Mory Kanté, made world-famous by the tube Yéké Yéké in the 1980s, died Friday, may 22, 2020 at the age of 70 years in a hospital in Conakry, has announced his son Balla Kante to a correspondent of the AFP. The artist is off “around 9: 45 this morning at the hospital, the sino-guinean” in the guinean capital. “He was suffering from a chronic disease, and frequently travelled to France for treatment, but with the coronavirus was no longer possible,” he said. “We have seen his condition deteriorate rapidly, but I was surprised because he had already gone through times much worse”, he added.

Mory Kanté, known as the “griot electric”, helped to popularize african music and guinean around the world. Yéké Yéké, one of the greatest hits in the history of african music released in 1987, sold millions of copies, and has reached the tops of hit-parades in many countries.

Born into a famous family of griots, these poets, storytellers, musicians, custodians of oral culture in Africa, Mory Kanté was one of the first musicians, with the Malian Salif Keita, to disseminate the mandingue music far from its borders. The one who has spent much of his youth in neighboring Mali from Guinea are joined at the beginning of the 70s, the famous Rail Band of Bamako, which Salif Keita was the singer.

After leaving the Rail Band, he revolutionized the music of west africa in the 1980s, electrifying his instrument and the opening of the traditional music from mandingo village to beats electronic and the “grooves” more urban. The concept of “World Music” was then still in its infancy.

Mory Kanté, who was the goodwill ambassador for the united Nations Organization for food (FAO) and sang to benefit the fight against fever Ebola which hit hard the Guinea between 2013 and 2016, was an essential personality in his country.

“The african culture is in mourning, has tweeted the president Alpha Condé. Thank you the artist. An exceptional golf course. Copy. A “pride”.

“He leaves an immense legacy for the culture, too vast for that we can all cite,” said his son and “he has also done a lot for the culture in his country by building studios, of cultural structures. But above all, he valued the music of guinean and african by making it known throughout the world”.

“He leaves an immense legacy for the culture, too vast for that we can all cite,” said his son and “he has also done a lot for the culture in his country by building studios, of cultural structures. But above all, he valued the music of guinean and african by making it known throughout the world”.